Land Acknowledgement


Land Acknowledgement Perth-Huron Information

Social Research and Planning Council Operated by United Way Perth Huron

“An opportunity to recognize the value of Indigenous People, their knowledge, rights and our compromise for change”

The mission of the Social Research and Planning Council is to inspire social progress through research and planning with accurate, local, and relevant evidence that promotes actions by supporting the implementation of inclusive and holistic community change. As part of this transformation, we are committed to the path of ongoing reconciliation with Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples based on mutually respectful relationships within the 94 Truth and Reconciliation Commission Calls to Action. As a result, we researched and developed a Land Acknowledgement Statement for the United Way Perth-Huron to reconfirm our commitment to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action.

 

Today, we would like to acknowledge the long history of Turtle Island from coast to coast and the original people of this territory. We are grateful for the opportunity to work and live here and express gratitude to all the generations of people who have taken care of this land for thousands of years.

Since the beginning, there have been Indigenous people who have been stewards of this place, the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee Nations, Anishnaabe Nations, and Neutral People who have taken care of this land where today is the place of Huron and Perth Counties. This territory is covered by the Huron Tract registered as Treaty 29 in the Upper Canada Treaties of 1827 and by the Saugeen Tract registered as Treaty 45 ½ in 1836, signed regarding this land.

We also acknowledge the Indigenous people on these lands at the time of the Wampum treaties including the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Treaty, under which multiple nations agreed to care for the land and resources by the Great Lakes in peace.

We do recognize with humility the inequities connected to colonization and we raise awareness to ensure this history never repeats itself.

We show respect, recognition, and commitment to the ancestors of this land to move forward in the spirit of reconciliation, actions, and initiatives to aid the present and future generations of Indigenous People in an inclusive and vibrant community for all.

We invite you to reflect upon this statement, how it connects to your personal story, and what actions you can take in your daily life or from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Thank you to Deanna Jones-Keeshing for the knowledge and expertise as we continue to learn and unlearn.

Understanding our land acknowledgement and recognition statement

Why does United Way Perth-Huron do land acknowledgements and recognition statements?

United Way values the rich diversity of all community members. We strive to create inclusive environments where everyone’s voice and experiences are honoured and respected. In providing land acknowledgements and recognition statements, United Way seeks to honour and build connection with historic populations.

Land acknowledgements and recognition statements help us remember and understand the longstanding histories and legacies of colonization and slavery that have directly impacted the communities we serve. These legacies created the social conditions that have resulted in poverty, homeless, and social exclusion. We use these to express our intent to create communities and spaces where we work to dismantle injustices, create welcoming and inclusive environments. We work to pursue space where everyone belongs, and dedicate ourselves to a lifelong process of working towards truth, reconciliation, and equity. These statements are not static we may have to adjust along the way as we learn from our work, mistakes, and successes. But this work is too important to our communities and to Canadians for us to let those things get in our way.

As part of our growth as a community, it is essential to advocate for reconciliation and renew the relationship with Indigenous People. The first national step toward recognition and acceptance was given1 by the True and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in 2015 with 94 calls to action, the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People Act (UNDRIP)2007. Primarily those documents highlight the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. But at the same time, it provides mandates of recognition, healing, and peace based on principles of justice, democracy, respect for human rights, non-discrimination, and acceptance2. The Land Acknowledgment is the beginning of reconciliation and awareness of this continuum change of equality and justice for all.

What is the Land Acknowledgement? 3 4

It is an action in the process of decolonization. It is the act of reconciliation that involves a meaningful statement where we recognize the traditional territory of the Indigenous people who are the steward of the land, and where we as settlers are accommodated from an oppressive system of colonization.

Why is important the Land Acknowledgement? 5

Indigenous People have an intimate link with the land, it has a vital attachment to their spirit, mind, heart, and well-being with a dynamic connection. Acknowledging the land shows recognition and respect for Aboriginal peoples, their land, and the relationship between them.

When do we need the Land Acknowledgement? 6

  • It is an important statement to consider before any meeting or conference regardless of the meeting’s size.
  • Any event independently of the participation of Indigenous People.
  • Any virtual meeting where you are the host, give the recognition and invite others to offer their land acknowledgements.
  • At your introduction in a meeting (presential or virtual) after your name.

1Government of Canada, Government of Canada advances implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Act, reviewed March 2022. 2The Philanthropic Community’s Declaration of Action, page 1. 3McMaster Students Union, Introduction to Land Acknowledgements. 4Ontario Federation of Labour. Traditional Territory Acknowledgements in Ontario, retrieved from https://ofl.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017-12-04-Traditional-Territory-Acknowledgements.pdf 5Western University, more than words. 6Native Governance Centre, A Guide to Indigenous Land Acknowledgment, https://ofl.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017-12-04-Traditional-Territory-Acknowledgements.pdf


United Way Perth-Huron Land Acknowledgement

Full Statement

“Today, and before starting this meeting, I/we would like to acknowledge the long history of Turtle Island from coast to coast and the original people of this territory. I/we am/are grateful for the opportunity to work and live here and express gratitude to all the generations of people who have taken care of this land for thousands of years.

Since the beginning, there have been Indigenous people who have been stewards of this place, the traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee Nations, Anishnaabew Nations, and Neutral People who have taken care of this land where today is the place of Huron and Perth Counties. This territory is covered by the Huron Tract registered as Treaty 29 in the Upper Canada Treaties of 1827 and by the Saugeen Tract registered as Treaty 45 ½ in 1836, signed regarding this land.

I/we also acknowledge the Indigenous people on these lands at the time of the Wampum treaties including the Dish with One Spoon Wampum Treaty, under which multiple nations agreed to care for the land and resources by the Great Lakes in peace. I/we do recognize with humility the inequities connected to colonization and I/we raise awareness to ensure this history never repeats itself.

I/we show respect, recognition, and commitment to the ancestors of this land to move forward in the spirit of reconciliation, actions, and initiatives to aid the present and future generations of Indigenous People in an inclusive and vibrant community for all.

I/we invite you to reflect upon this statement, how it connects to your personal story, and what actions you can take in your daily life or from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.”

Short statement

I acknowledge the long history of the original people who steward the place where we are currently standing. The traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee Nations, Anishnaabew Nations, and Neutral People, Territory covered by treaties 29 and 45 ½. Together they have administered the land that today is the place of Huron and Perth Counties. United Way shows respect, recognition, and commitment to the path of ongoing reconciliation, appreciation of rights, respect, cooperation, collaboration, and partnership to aid the present and future generations of Indigenous People in an inclusive and vibrant community for all.

Pronunciation Guide

Audio of pronunciations: indigenous.uwo.ca/initiatives/land-acknowledgement

  • Anishinaabew (A-nish-in-ah-bay): Anishinaabeg/Anishinaabek/Anishnabek/Anishnaabeg: this name covers Ojibway/Chippewa, Odawa, Algonquin, Potawatomi, Nipissing, Mississaugas, Saulteau, plus all the Algonkian/Ojibwa Nations.
  • Haudenosaunee (Hode-en-o-shownee): This name refers to the Iroquois Confederacy comprising these Nations: Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, and Tuscarora.
  • Attiwonderonk (Add-a-won-da-runk): Like other Iroquoian nations, their territory was established between Lake Ontario and the Grand River, which stretches between Kitchener and Toronto. Known as neutral people.

Personal Introduction

Your name / pronouns / and role as part of United Way Perth-Huron would like to acknowledge the traditional territory of (a traditional territory where you are located) and where I am today.

Perth Mississauga, Anishnaabew, Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), and Attiwonderonk (Neutral) peoples. Treaty 29.
City of Stratford Mississauga, Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, Anishnaabew, Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), Ojibway/ Chippewa, and Attiwonderonk (Neutral) peoples. Treaty 29.
Town of St. Marys Mississauga, Anishnaabew, and Attiwonderonk (Neutral) peoples. Treaty 29.
North Perth (Listowel) Mississauga, Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, Anishnaabew, and Odawa peoples. Treaty 29.
Perth East (Milverton) Mississauga, Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, Anishnaabew. Treaty 29.
Perth East (Shakespeare) Mississauga, Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, Anishnaabew, and Attiwonderonk (Neutral) Treaty 29.
West Perth (Mitchell) Mississauga, Anishnaabew, and Attiwonderonk (Neutral) peoples. Treaty 29.
South Perth Mississauga, Anishnaabew, and Attiwonderonk (Neutral) peoples. Treaty 29.
Huron The traditional territory of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), Ojibway/Chippewa, and Anishnaabew. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties, Treaty 29 (1827) and Treaty 45 ½ (1836)
Township of Ashfield-Colborne-Wawanosh (Lucknow) Mississauga, Anishnaabew, and Odawa peoples. Treaty 45 ½.
Municipality of Bluewater Mississauga and Anishnaabew peoples. Treaty 29.
Central Huron (Clinton) Mississauga, Anishnaabew, and Odawa peoples. Treaty 29.
Town of Goderich Saugeen Ojibway Nation, Mississauga, Anishnaabew, and Odawa peoples. Treaty 29 and Treaty 45 ½.
Township of Howick Mississauga, Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation Anishnaabew, and Odawa. Treaty 29 and 45 ½.
Huron East (Seaforth) Mississauga and Anishnaabew peoples. Treaty 29.
Municipality of Morris-Turnberry (Wingham) Mississauga, Anishnaabew, and Odawa. Treaty 45 ½.
Township of North Huron (Blyth) Mississauga, Anishnaabew, and Odawa. Treaty 29.
South Huron (Exeter) Mississauga, Anishnaabew, and Attiwonderonk (Neutral) peoples. Treaty 29.
London The traditional territory of the Anishinaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Attawandaron (Neutral), and Wendat peoples. This territory is covered by the Upper Canada Treaties.

Resources: Truth and Reconciliation

From the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement. One of the elements of the agreement was the establishment of the TRC of Canada to facilitate reconciliation among former students, their families, their communities and all Canadians.

TRC Mini Documentary – Senator Murray Sinclair on Reconciliation (youtu.be/wjx2zDvyzsU)

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People Act

Received as Royal Assent and came into force. This Act provides a roadmap for the Government of Canada and Indigenous People to work together to implement the Declaration based on lasting reconciliation, healing and cooperative relations.

Our Rights: Indigenous Youth on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (youtu.be/oKQFx5Im4BQ)

Aboriginal Peoples and Historic Trauma

The process of intergenerational transmission recognizes that Aboriginal peoples’ experiences are rooted in multigenerational, cumulative, and chronic trauma, injustices, and oppression. The effects of trauma can reverberate through individuals, families, communities and entire populations, resulting in a legacy of physical, psychological, and economic disparities that persist across generations.

Aboriginal Peoples and Historic Trauma: The process of intergenerational transmission 

Tool kit of Trainings and Courses

Equal Futures Network 

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